The Boy Mir / Ten Years In Afghanistan

ORIGINAL LANGUAGE: DARI

Ten years in Afghanistan.

Ten years of war and destruction and ten years of one little boy’s life. Continue reading

Advertisements

The 16th Martyrdom anniversary of shaheed Abdulali Mazari

The 16th Martyrdom anniversary of shaheed ustad Abdulali Mazari

It has been unanimously decided that all the Hazaras of the UK with collaboration of Hazara International Forum of Great Britain shall commemorate the 16th Martyrdom Anniversary of Shaheed Ustad Abdul Ali Mazari Continue reading

Afshar Massacre will never ever forgot

Afshar Massacred by Ahmad shah Masoud and Sayaf in 1993

According to The Guardian, November 16, 2001: “On February 11, 1993, Massoud and Sayyaf’s forces entered the Hazara suburb of Afshar, killing – by local accounts – “up to 1,000 civilians”, beheading old men, Continue reading

Thousands of Afghan asylum seekers face deportation

AUSTRALIA has the green light to deport thousands of Afghan asylum seekers after reaching a historic agreement with the Afghan government.

The Immigration Minister, Chris Bowen, signed a memorandum of understanding Continue reading

Massacre of Hazara Turks in Bamyan

Mass Killing during the Military Operation of Taliban:

The Taliban first time entered Bamyan city 13th September, 1998 after short fighting on Aghrubut pass. On 15-17 September the Taliban launched search in Bamyan villages to find out suspect people. Continue reading

Afghan Election: Conflict between Democracy and Terrorism in Ghazni

The Afghanistan Election Commission announced final results for 33 of Afghanistan’s provinces plus the results of 10 special seats for Kuchi Pashtuns in the lower house. However, in a blatant swipe at democracy, the final tally from the province of Ghazni is still pending and the election commission has said Continue reading

Copper load of this! Company digging mine in Afghanistan unearths 2,600-year-old Buddhist monastery

A Chinese company digging an unexploited copper mine in Afghanistan has unearthed ancient statues of Buddha in a sprawling 2,600-year-old Buddhist monastery.

Archaeologists are rushing to salvage what they can from a major 7th century B.C. religious site along the famed Silk Road connecting Asia Continue reading

A de facto partition for Afghanistan

The Obama administration’s counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan seems headed for failure. Given the alternatives, de facto partition of Afghanistan is the best policy option available to the United States and its allies.

After the administration’s December Continue reading

Hazara “Ger” in Bamyan

Below is a video from American tourists who visited Bamyan in 1970s.

This historic footage shows Mongol-like “Gers” in Bamyan, the cultural and historical capital of Hazarajat, the Hazaraland in Afghanistan. Continue reading

The Timuries As Builders

Timur was not only a great conqueror; he was also a great builder. Whenever he laid waste to a city that stood in the path of his army, he would bring back the artisans to build his royal city of Samarqand. “There were sculptors, stone-masons and stucco-workers from Azerbaijan, Isfahan and Delhi; Mosaic-workers from Shiraz; weavers, glass-blowers and potters from Damascus – in such numbers that ‘the city was not big enough to hold them. Continue reading

Qarluq / Karluk Hazaras

Qarluq Hazaras, also pronounced as “Qalugh”, live mainly in Baghlan and a large number of them once lived in Uruzgan province of Central Afghanistan (Hazaristan). In Baghlan, they are an independent Hazara tribe, whereas in Uruzgan, they were a sub-tribe of one of the Hazara tribes that lived in that province, possibly Dai Khitai or Polada (1). There were three main Hazara tribes in Uruzgan, Dai Chuban, Dai Khitai, Polada and also a number of smaller Hazara clans.
This was before Amir Abdur Rahman’s invasion attempts to try to eliminate local Hazaras living in Uruzgan and instead repopulate the region with his followers. His army faced fierce resistance from the local Hazara tribes in Uruzgan. His army was defeated in many of his first attempts, however, since local Hazaras were surrounded from all around, they were eventually defeated and most of their population were either massacred or forced to flee their homeland.

Amir Abdur Rahman’s invasion not only fulfilled his goal which was to massacre an ethnic group and force them to flee their homeland but through this, he was also able to unite many other tribes to follow him in this act. They were told that Hazaras are “infidels”, so he was going to a “holy war” against them.

Among the Uruzgani Hazaras, there are no Polada and Dai Khitai Hazaras left today. From Dai Chuban tribe, Maska, which is a sub-tribe, were also affected and lower Maska region was entirely invaded. Qalandar, a sub-tribe of Dai Chuban faced a similar situation to Polada and Dai Khitai Hazaras. This is surely the greatest loss to a nation to have three of their tribes being massacred at once. Nowadays we do not hear much of Qarlurq sub-tribe among the Hazaras in Uruzgan, which shows that they either faced similar situation as the Polada and Dai Khitai Hazaras or they fled to somewhere else that we are unaware of. Many Hazaras fled to Quetta in Pakistan and also Mashhad in Iran. There is no trace of them in Quetta, which leaves Mashhad the only hope. There has not been any proper search done among the Irani Hazaras in Mashhad yet. We also hear that some Hazaras (possibly Maska Hazaras) left Mashhad for Turkmenistan.

P.S. It would be a great help if anyone with any news/info could either leave a comment or contact me regarding Uruzgani Qarluq Hazaras and Maska Hazaras who fled to Iran and Turkmenistan.

Hamed Batur

Sources:

(1) This was one of the findings of Sir Alexander Burnes, an English explorer who passed Hazara villages in Uruzgan in early 1800’s on his way to Kabul. This piece of info was taken by an Author named Elizabeth E. Bacon, from one of his journals in London.


Karlugh Turk

A brief post about Hazaras of Baghlan and Samangan

Bağlan is one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan. It is of great significance to Hazara history and unity. It has shown capabilities in unifying local Hazaras regardless of whether they are Sunni or Shia in good and bad times. There are also Hazaras in Qundoz (e.g. Khaan Abaad Hazaras), Balkh, Badakhshan and Takhar, but this post is mainly about Hazaras in Baghlan and Samangan. Continue reading

Stage 1 – Hazara ancestors before 12th century (Ak Huns)

The Huns

‘Turan’ is an ancient Dari word which means Central and part of North Asia. To be more specific it refers to the regions that are today known as Mongolia and some countries surrounding it. Around 400 BC, present day Mongolia was home to many nomadic tribes. Continue reading